From gaming disorder to selfitis, there are a whole host of health conditions caused by modern-day technology.

It is only now that experts are starting to recognise the symptoms and diagnose people.

But what exactly are the health conditions,and what should you do if you’re suffering from one?

Gaming disorder

With so many people addicted to video games such as Fortnite, the World Health Organisation has ­classified “gaming disorder”as a mental health issue.

Sufferers repeatedly give priority to playing video games over other activities, such as socialising and even sleeping.

It is thought that up to 10 per cent of gamers could be affected.

The World Health Organisation has classified ‘gaming disorder’ as a mental health issue
(Image: Getty Images)

The NHS has launched a new specialist clinic for gamers aged 13-25 – The Centre For Internet and Gaming Disorders.

The Family Lives charity can also offer advice on dealing with kids’ gaming. Call 0808 800 2222.

Text neck

Texting
Tilting your head scrolling through Instagram posts can put up to 60lb of pressure on your neck
(Image: Rex)

Tilting your head while scrolling through your Instagram posts can put up to 60lb of pressure on your neck, according to spinal surgeons.

Staying in this position for prolonged periods of time can also cause muscles to become sore and inflamed – known as text neck.

Researchers found the behaviour is causing some of us to develop extra lumps of bone at the base of our skulls. Experts recommend trying to look at your phone at eye level, while the NHS website suggests lengthening your neck upwards as you tuck in your chin.

Smartphone thumb

A survey found that 43 per cent of smartphone users have experienced thumb pain
(Image: Getty Images/Westend61)

A survey found that 43 per cent of smartphone users have experienced thumb pain. That repetitive fine motor activity we use when swiping or typing on our phones can cause numbness, as well as cramping in the fingers, wrist and forearm.

This may lead to carpal tunnel syndrome, where nerves are compressed, or inflammation known as tendonitis.

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons also warns of mobile elbow – caused by bending the arm too long while using phones. Limit damage by switching hands regularly and sending voice messages rather than long typed ones.

Selfitis

Selfitis sufferers have an uncontrollable urge to take photographs of themselves
(Image: Alamy Stock Photo)

Can’t stop posting selfies? Then you might have selfitis – a condition identified by researchers at ­Nottingham Trent University.

They found that those with a compulsive need to post were often lacking in self-confidence. Sufferers are deemed to be people who have an uncontrollable urge to take ­photographs of themselves.

Nomopobia

A YouGov survey found 53 per cent of people became anxious when their handsets weren’t nearby
(Image: Getty Images)

This refers to the anxiety arising from not being able to use a mobile phone (NO MObile… get it?).

A YouGov survey found that 53 per cent of people became anxious when their handsets weren’t nearby.

However, a study in the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology found that limiting the likes of ­Instagram to 10 minutes a day over time could reduce symptoms.

Computer vision syndrome

Computer Vision Syndrome Symptoms include eye strain and dry eyes, as well as blurred vision
(Image: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Symptoms include eye strain and dry eyes, as well as blurred vision.

US research suggests 90 per cent of computer users who are in front of screens for three hours a day or more have experienced one or more of the symptoms.

Try to follow the 20-20-20-20 rule – blinking 20 times in a row every 20 minutes, looking away from the screen for 20 seconds
and focusing on an object 20ft away.

Console sores

Dermatologists advise people not to play computer games excessively, especially if your hands are prone to sweating
(Image: Getty Images/iStockphoto)

Our physical health can suffer from video games, as much as our mental health. A skin condition dubbed PlayStation Palmar Hidradenitis has been described in the British Journal of Dermatology.

It involves sores developing on the hands of those who play games for many hours a day.

Dermatologists advise people not to play excessively, especially if your hands are prone to sweating.

Researchers at Leeds Teaching Hospital also identified an injury they called “Wii knee” caused by bending while playing sporting games on consoles.

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